A global field guide to design, (life)style and secret finds
est. 2007
  1. My Collections: ’60s and ’70s miniature toys

    Small collectable toys from the '70s. Photo: Lisa Tilse for We Are Scout

    Here are just some of the slightly weird and fairly wonderful things that have been collected over the years by my family during the ’60s and ’70s.

    This rather motley collection of miniature vintage plastic toys had been kept in an old orange ice-cream container for over 40 years, and it had been long forgotten when I rescued it from the back of the wardrobe when I moved out of home around 20 years ago.

    Being a nostalgic soul with an eye for retro plastic treasure, I squirreled it away in a box with my other childhood toys, and some choice items have only recently found a new home in my five-year-old son’s room.

    The toys have fairly non-specific origins, but mum does remember buying the tiny figurines when my family was living in the UK at various times in the ’60s and ’70s. Some toys may have been prizes from cereal boxes, Christmas crackers or lucky dips.

    A colourful collection of 70s miniature toys and figurines by Rebecca Lowrey Boyd/We Are Scout. Photo: Lisa Tilse for We Are Scout

    My favourites? The Kiss comb, obviously. And the dinky souvenir camera has always been very special.

    Want to see more stuff I collect? You might like to check out my vintage badge collection; my ‘80s novelty eraser collection; or my collection of historical finds from the banks of the Thames.

    Tell me: does anything look familiar to you in my collection? Tell me about it!

    Photography and styling by Lisa Tilse for We Are Scout.
    This post was originally published on We Are Scout.

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    • coburgcraftstuff

      What a great collection! The blue and pink double flower things look familiar, a long lost memory forgotten until now! The yellow horse-on-a-spring I think I know- I had a blue woodpecker type bird, and a couple of other shapes/ creatures – there was also a thin, flexible plastic rod not quite as long as a ruler, and a black base piece a bit like a spoked wagon wheel. You stood the rod up in the centre of the flat wheel, slotted the bird/ horse onto the rod ( there is a hole through the bead/ knob end of the spring) then tapped the bird/ horse shape and watched it wobble its way down the rod to the base. So the ” woodpecker” would appear to be pecking at the rod as it wobbled and nodded its way to the base. Oh the things you used to find in a box of breakfast cereal!